Letters to the Editor

Editorial Opinion: 
Online Exclusive: 

Letter to the Editor: Pressure ulcer management in disasters in low-resourced countries

  We read with interest the article by Sato and Ichioka1 on pressure ulcer occurrence following the great East Japan Earthquake. Because research on pressure ulcers (PU) in disasters is limited, we wanted to share our experience with PU in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients in the 2005 Pakistan earthquake.

  SCI is an established risk factor for development of PU. The 2005 Pakistan earthquake resulted in hundreds of acute SCI for which our healthcare system neither had resources nor adequate expertise.2 Evacuation priority from the disaster zone was given to persons with open wounds and broken bones, delaying evacuation of SCI patients in many cases.3 There was only one spinal rehabilitation unit in the country; patients had to be managed in makeshift paraplegic centers.3 At that time and even today, there are no trained rehabilitation or skin care nurses in Pakistan.4 PU risk assessment and monitoring is not routinely performed or documented. The attitude of our healthcare professionals (HCPs) toward pressure ulcer recognition and prevention has been described as casual5 and further complicated by the fact that Pakistan was/is a low-resourced developing country with an inadequate healthcare infrastructure....

Letter to the Editor: Pressure Ulcers: The Role of Thermography and the Need to Revisit Staging

  Regarding the article, Farid et al. Using temperature of pressure-related intact discolored areas of skin to detect deep tissue injury: an observational, retrospective, correlational study. Ostomy Wound Manage. 2012;58(8):20–31: The article was a single-institution retrospective review of pressure-related color changes in the setting of intact skin.

  With respect to the staging system, the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel follows the scientific process. As such, change is warranted based on robust and confirmed research. Also, any definition meant for widespread use must walk the line between comprehension and comprehensiveness....

Letters to the Editor: The Oxygen Issue

  As a hyperbaracist actively practicing the specialty for more than 18 years, I have several thoughts on the articles included in “The oxygen issue” (June 2010) of Ostomy Wound Management.

  I am somewhat dismayed after reading Mutluoglu M, Uzun G, Yildiz S. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers — prudent or problematic. a case report. Ostomy Wound Manage. 2010;56(6):32–35. The authors have misled the readers by inappropriately titling the article. The title suggests that hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in advanced wound care for diabetic wounds can cause problems. The title missed the importance of the article, which was the lack of basic wound care provided to the patient discussed in this case. ...

Letters to the Editor: The study of topical oxygen use

  With regard to the article on topical oxygen (Blackman E, Moore C, Hyatt J, Railton R, Frye C. Topical wound oxygen therapy in the treatment of severe diabetic foot ulcers: a prospective controlled study. Ostomy Wound Manage. 2010;56(6):24–31), I am concerned that a nonrandomized, nonblinded trial was published in your journal. The results are meaningless in my practice, especially so because the study was paid for by the manufacturer.   This paper will be quoted by third-party payors wanting to refuse hyperbaric oxygen therapy. This is a shame beca

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Letters to the Editor: Addressing Duplicate Publication Concerns

Regarding Takahashi PY, Chandra A, Cha SS, Crane SJ. A predictive model for venous ulceration in older adults: results of a retrospective cohort study. Ostomy Wound Manage. 2010;56(4):60–66.

Dear Editor,

  This brief letter of explanation and discussion describes the major findings in the two articles under comparison: A cross-sectional evaluation of the association between lower extremity venous ulceration and predictive risk factors1 and A predictive model for venous ulceration in older adults: results of a retrospective cohort study.2 Whi...

Letters to the Editor: Persistent DNA

Dear Editor,

     As noted by the authors of the article Serena TE, Bialas P. Persistence of bilayered living-cell therapy donor DNA 10 months after application: a case report. (Ostomy Wound Manage. 2009;55[10]18–22), 10 months is considerably longer persistence than previously reported in multiple studies. In six published studies involving 52 patients,1-6 no Apligraf (Organogenesis, Canton, MA) cells were found (by RT-PCR) at 6 weeks following application and only one (a single study in patients treated for epidermolysis bullosa, the data of which the author conc...

Letters to the Editor: Healing Wounds in Long-Term Care

     The study presented in Takahashi PY, Kiemele LJ, Chandra A, Cha SS, Targonski PV, A retrospective cohort study of factors that affect healing in long-term care residents with chronic wounds (Ostomy Wound Manage. 2009;55[1]:32–37) provides valuable insights into factors affecting healing in long-term care (LTC) residents with chronic wounds. A prospective cohort study1,2 conducted in several settings including LTC reported ulcer depth, characterized as partial-thickness or full-thickness, was a significant predictor of chronic wound healing time as well as perce...

Letter to the Editor

Dear Editor,

  I commend Clinical Editor Lia van Rijswijk for her editorial, "First, Do No Harm," that appeared in the March 2008 issue of Ostomy Wound Management....

Letters to the Editor: Radiation Enteritis: Another Consideration

Dear Editor,

  As a wound care nurse with experience in acute care, long-term care, and wound care clinic settings, I was disappointed that hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) was not listed as a treatment standard in a recent “The Ostomy Files” (Turnbull G. Radiation enteritis in the patient with a fecal ostomy. Ostomy Wound Manage. 2007;53[9]:10-12). Many publications and a section from the Medicare Coverage Database reference HBOT as an adjunctive treatment in the plan of care for soft tissue and bony radiation tissue damage....

Letters to the Editor: Silver: Clarifying the Claims

Dear Editor,

    While we applaud Mr. Brett’s intention (A discussion of silver as an antimicrobial agent: alleviating the confusion. Ostomy Wound Manage. 2006;52[1]:34–41), “the fine line between info-mercial and information”1 may have been crossed....