Editor's Opinion

The Editorial Implications of Pressure Ulcer and Pressure Injury

It’s been almost 2 years since the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) changed the term pressure ulcer to pressure injury and made changes to previously used staging de...

Editor's Opinion: Human Nature, Science, and Evidence-Based Practice

It is no secret that implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) in health care is nowhere near the levels it should be.1 It also is well known that a myriad of factors affect the di...

Editor's Opinion: Environmental Awareness in Wound Care

Louis Pasteur (1822–1895), generally considered the father of bacteriology and the germ theory of disease,1 is purported to have said, “The microbe is nothing....

Editor's Opinion: A Wound on Wound Care or a Wake-up Call?

The headline1 read, “Wounds that won’t heal fuel $5B business, but little evidence.” The photograph showed a woman, seated in her home, who has been “fighting a diabetes-related wound on...

Editorial Opinion: Calling All Nursing Students: How Much Wound Care is in Your Future?

This month, more than 2,000 student nurses and nursing faculty will attend the National Student Nurses Association Annual Convention in Orlando, FL....

Editor’s Opinion: Progress: Baby Steps Yield Leaps and Bounds

    Clinicians know they must answer 3 questions before implementing any intervention: 1) Can it work? 2) Does it work? 3) Is it worth it?1 Most issues of Ostomy Wound Management contain preclinical and clinical reports that attempt to answer the first of these questions. For the clinician looking for information and guidance in the literature, it may be disheartening to realize a study does not provide solid answers to the second or third question and yield ready-to-use results. In fact, many studies only answer part of the first question using in vivo or in vitro research methodologies — baby steps toward the ultimate goal of implementing care that is efficacious, effective, and cost effective....

Editor’s Opinion: Don’t Let Winds of Change Blow Patient-Provider Relationships

A small provision that became law in 1996 continues to profoundly affect how we interact with patients. As is often the case with legislative bills, HIPAA included verbiage that approved implementation of a pilot program to test high-deductible health insurance plans and savings accounts.1...

Editor’s Opinion: Keeping the Pressure On Taking the Pressure Off

  Every health care professional knows the mantra for pressure ulcer prevention in high-risk patients includes repositioning (if consistent with the overall goal of patient care) and the use of support surfaces and pressure-redistribution cushions....

Editor's Opinion: Deja Vu

  You know you have been practicing in the area of wound, skin, incontinence, or ostomy care for some time when you can predict that every review of the literature will contain at least one sentence that reads something like this: "At this time, there is not enough evidence to ...."...

Editor's Opinion: Removing the "Un" from the Law of Unintended Consequences

   Once upon a time, we lived in a world where clinicians provided patient care and researchers explored new ways to provide that care. Editors read the work they received and publishers published. Also in this world, patients presumed the care they received was based on the best science available at that time and clinicians believed that what they read and learned was accurate and objective....