Online Exclusives

Global Guardian: Michael Liske: Medical Teamwork Amid Turmoil

  Michael Liske, MD first went to Kenya in 2008 on what he called an “exploratory trip,” motivated mostly by a sense of adventure. While there, he became familiarized with the city of Tenwek. As the only visiting doctor in Kenya during this initial trip, Dr. Liske saw first-hand the desperate need for medical help as a result of a bloody crisis following the country’s elections. After falling asleep to the sound of gunshots as the country’s turmoil worsened, his motivation shifted. The focus of his second trip to Kenya wasn’t about adventure. It was “to help thy neighbor.”

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Notes on Practice: Thinking Out of the Box to Treat Challenging Ankle Wounds

By David Davidson, DPM, Erie County Medical Center, Center for Wound Care, Buffalo, NY. ddavidson@aapsm.org

  History. A 41-year-old man presented with chronic ulcerations (7-year duration) along the medial and lateral aspects of both ankles. His medical history included T10 paraplegia (15 years), anxiety, chronic ankle wound infections resulting in hospital admissions, depression, and multiple suicide attempts. His medications included Ditropan (Ortho-McNeil-Janssen-Pharmaceutical, Inc) 5 mg bid, Seroquel (Astra-Zeneca) 25 mg bid, Dulcolax (Boehringer Ingelheim), Trazadone 50 mg bid, magnesium, and multiple vitamins. He denied alcohol or recreational drug use; he was a former cigarette smoker. He had been in the care of his primary care doctor, orthopedic surgeons, and vascular surgeons for multiple (failed) skin grafts and multiple spinal surgeries and other conventional wound care, but the wounds never resolved. He lived alone and, despite his paralysis (he is wheelchair-bound), seemed reasonably self-sufficient.

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CEO Spotlight: Mark Ludwig of Joerns Healthcare

OWM: Please describe the education, training, and work experiences that have prepared you for your current position as CEO of Joerns Healthcare.
  With more than 20 years of medical device-related experience, I have had the opportunity to work for a broad set of high-tech companies on process and organizational improvement. I began my career as a systems engineer and account executive at Electronic Data Systems (EDS) in Plano, TX, where I led many key business initiatives for manufacturing companies across the country. After completing my Executive MBA in 1996 at the University of Pittsburgh, I transitioned from EDS to Sunrise Medical in Carlsbad, CA. Sunrise was an important EDS customer at the time, and I believed I could contribute more toward Sunrise’s goals as a direct member of their team. At Sunrise, I was fortunate to lead many different organizational functions. I leveraged that experience to take on the role as President and CEO of Joerns Healthcare in 2004. Our management team at Joerns felt strongly about the organization’s tremendous potential and that establishing Joerns as an independent company would enable us to realize our vision to redefine the environment in which care is delivered. In 2006, Joerns Healthcare became an independent company with the assets and capital needed to position the company for maximum success.

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CEO Spotlight: Laurie Swezey of WoundEducators.com

OWM: Please describe your education, training, and work experiences that have prepared you for your current position as CEO of WoundEducators.com.
  I have been a registered nurse for more than 25 years, most of those years dedicated to wound treatment. Throughout my career, I have seen that certified wound specialists can dramatically improve patient outcomes and significantly reduce the overall cost of care — a win-win situation for all. However, some years ago I identified a significant shortage of medical professionals specifically qualified in wound care, as well as very little access to available and affordable wound care education or certification programs. As a result, I shifted my focus from educating a few to facilitating wound certification nationwide by founding www.WoundEducators.com. My goal, and the mission of www.WoundEducators.com, is to revolutionize wound care by delivering convenient and affordable wound care education, facilitating wound care certification, and improving practitioner expertise and patient care.

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Notes on Practice: Keys to Understanding the Science of Compression Wrapping

  Compression therapy is a widely used treatment for various forms of edema. In an orthopedic setting, it is commonly used to limit postoperative edema and edema due to trauma. In wound care, compression therapy has many uses, including the management of complications associated with venous, lymphatic, and sickle cell disorders. When applied properly, compression wraps are instrumental to successful management of these conditions. When applied poorly, at best the condition does not improve and at worst the condition deteriorates or leads to iatrogenic complications.

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CEO Spotlight: Hoji Alimi of Oculus Innovative Sciences, Inc

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OWM: Please describe the education, training, and work experiences that have prepared you for your current position as CEO of Oculus Innovative Sciences, Inc.   I have an undergraduate degree in biology. My training has been in microbiology and toxicology. I began my career at Arterial Vascular Engineering, a stent company, in 1995; at that time, the company was private and growing. The company completed its IPO in 1996 and was subsequently purchased by Medtronic in 1998. I served as a corporate microbiologist and managed some of their QA engineering functions in their Canadian operations as well.

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Global Guardian: Nancy Faller: V is for Versatile, Visionary, Volunteer

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  She may be small in stature, but what Nancy Faller, RN, PhD, CETN, may lack in height and girth, she more than compensates for in heart. This globetrotting provider of care and compassion (and sometime poet and creative writer) has been tending to patients in countries from A to almost Z, including with the US military. She personifies the word guardian — she is protective, dedicated to championing her patients’ right to heal.

The Wonder of Calcium Alginate

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  Calcium alginate is a highly absorbent, biodegradable alginate dressing derived from seaweed. Alginate dressings maintain a physiologically moist microenvironment that promotes healing and the formation of granulation tissue. Calcium alginate is readily removed with saline irrigation, making dressing changes virtually painless.1

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Dr. James G. Spahn of EHOB, Inc

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OWM: Please describe the education, training, and work experiences that have prepared you for your current position as CEO of EHOB.   
After becoming a doctor through Indiana University’s medical program in 1970, I specialized in otolaryngology and head and neck surgery for nearly 30 years. This was the beginning of my extensive training in soft-tissue survival. In the process of developing a positioning mattress to postoperatively elevate my patients’ heads, I learned that this product, known then as the Position Perfect®, also helped prevent and treat pressure ulcers. Fascinated by the fact that my past training and reconstructive surgery experience closely resembled the techniques recommended for pressure ulcer prevention and treatment, I founded EHOB, Inc in 1985 while continuing my practice as a physician.

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Ostomy Educational Program for Nurses in Jordan

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Having an ostomy does not mean having a lifelong disability. Living well with an ostomy can be achieved through patient preparation, education, and planning. Nurses who are knowledgeable in ostomy care can help a patient adjust to an ostomy. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the need for ostomy education for nurses in Jordan.   Although performed to improve patient health, ostomy surgery can be a life-changing event with both physical and psychological consequences. Persons with ostomies can experience poor quality of life (QOL), along with feelings of stigmatization, degradation, and isolation.1

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