Nutrition 411

Nutrition 411: Exercising to Improve Body Composition

Dr. Collins will be speaking in-depth about body composition and demonstrating how to measure it at the Symposium on Advanced Wound Care, San Antonio, TX, May 2, 2015.

  An estimated 42% of people over the age of 65 have limitations in performing one or more daily tasks that are essential for independence, such as walking a few blocks and transferring from sitting to standing.1...

Nutrition 411: Avoiding Dehydration in Patients With Wounds

  If you work in long-term care, you are probably familiar with the federal regulation requiring the provision of sufficient fluids to each patient, otherwise known as F327....

Nutrition 411: New CMS Rule Gives Dietitians Order Writing Privileges

  The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced a final rule that will allow registered dietitians (RDs) to become privileged to independently write orders beginning July 11, 2014....

Nutrition 411: An Introduction to Herbs for Wound Healing Professionals

Medicinal plants have played an important therapeutic role throughout history. Records of herbal remedies date back 5,000 years and document the evolution of ethnobotanical therapies from regional availability of plants and trade commerce to highly developed medical practice....

Nutrition 411: Managing Low Blood Glucose Levels in Patients Undergoing Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

Studies show all patients undergoing hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) experience a reduction in blood glucose levels compared to prehyperbaric oxygen treatment levels. This expected physiological reaction may result in a range of challenges for both patients and treatment centers, including hypoglycemic events, liability, schedule changes, cancellations, and ultimately delayed healing and a loss of revenue....

Nutrition 411: Strategies to Enhance Wound Healing in Frail Elders

  When meeting with a new patient, wound care professionals often focus on vital signs, oxygen saturation, medications, wound characteristics, and other clinical concerns. Although all of these are important to the recovery process, healing can be helped or hindered by the patient’s nutritional status, which often is not evaluated. The cause of poor nutrition in the elderly appears to be multifactorial and reflects physical and physiological limitations and psychosocial changes. Patients who are malnourished experience more complications and infections, which worsen their medical condition and decrease their survival rate.1 The accumulated effects of immobility, poor nutritional intake, and immune system challenges increase an elderly patient’s risk for pressure ulcers by 74%.2 For an already malnourished elderly patient with comorbidities, a pressure ulcer can be life-threatening. Although adequate dietary intake is important for all individuals, meeting the patient’s nutrient needs is even more important when a wound is present. This article will discuss various factors that hinder nutritional status and provide practical strategies to optimize nutrient intake and enhance wound healing....

Nutrition 411: Urinary Tract Infection: Prevention Strategy to Improve Quality Measures

  Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most prevalent infection in long-term care (LTC), accounting for at least 40% of all infections and more than 8% of total costs.1,2 UTIs are the leading driver of hospitalizations, with a 30% readmission rate from LTC within 30-days.3 They can cause urinary frequency, urgency, loss of bladder control, pain, burning upon urination, straining, flank or lower back pain, fever, a decrease in daily activity, and depression. Many times, alteration in mental status, confusion, lethargy, agitation, delirium, subtle changes in behavior, and falls can be the first indication of the presence of a UTI.4,5 UTIs can cause a decrease in appetite and an increase in metabolic rate, leading to unintended weight loss, negatively impacting nutritional status. These are all quality-of-care measures that can be improved by preventing UTIs. ...

Nutrition 411: The Diabetic Foot Ulcer — Can Diet Make a Difference?

  The statistics are shocking: 25.8 million Americans, or 8.3% of the population of the US, has been diagnosed with diabetes.1 Among the complications of the disease are diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), which affect as many as 20% of patients with diabetes during their lifetime.2 DFUs can significantly impair a patient’s quality of life, require prolonged hospitalization, involve infection and gangrene, and may ultimately result in amputation....

Nutrition 411: Revisiting Vitamin C and Wound Healing

  When discussing nutritional interventions for wound healing with healthcare practitioners, one of the most frequent questions posed is whether specific vitamin and mineral supplements enhance the rate of healing. Vitamin C is always specifically mentioned because it has routinely been prescribed for patients with wounds. As medicine evolves to evidenced-based practice, questions about the efficacy of this standing order have arisen. Currently, practice is divided; some medical facilities continue to supplement vitamin C, while others do not. Rigorously controlled studies concerning vitamin C still are lacking, so the debate and misinformation proliferate. This close look at vitamin C was originally published in OWM in 2009, but the need to shed some light on this topic persists. ...

Nutrition 411: Understanding Iron Deficiency and Anemia

  Patients with wounds frequently have low levels of hemoglobin and hematocrit, and clinicians often automatically think “iron deficiency.” Although in many cases that diagnosis may be correct, identifying a specific type of anemia takes a bit more investigation, including a nutrition-focused physical examination and additional biochemical data. This article reviews the basics about iron deficiency and anemia. ...