Can We Talk?

Can We Talk?: The National Plaintiff's Advisory Panel? Pressure Ulcers, Litigation and the NPUAP's New Staging System

Pressure ulcers are the most common reason for malpractice litigation against nursing homes and represent a substantial portion of claims against other sites of care including hospitals....

Can We Talk?: Censoring Science

According to a participant in the 90-minute briefing,1 policy analysts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia were told of a list of forbidden words ...

Can We Talk?: Implementing the NPUAP pressure injury changes

Bed sore. Decubitus ulcer. Pressure sore. Pressure ulcer. Pressure ulcer terminology has changed through the years....

Can We Talk?: Reminder: Social Media Isn’t As Safe As You Think

Several articles published in recent years showcase the difficulties health care practitioners can face because of careless social media posts. Katie Duke’s story is perhaps one of the best known....

Can We Talk?: Pressure Injury Replaces Pressure Ulcer: Provider Thoughts on Changes to Pressure Ulcer Staging

After a consensus process with interactive discussion and voting, the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) announced the term pressure injury should replace pressure ulcer...

Can We Talk?: Why Are We Still Seeing Pressure Ulcers?

  Pressure ulcer (PU) prevention has become a great healthcare irony. We know how to prevent PUs, yet according to a 2008 report from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality,1 their incidence and prevalence have increased substantially in recent decades in hospitalized patients in the United States. PUs are considered such a serious and complex a healthcare problem, Healthy People 2010 and Healthy People 2020 identify them as a critical target.2,3 The federal government considers Stage III and Stage IV ulcers reasonably preventable and directed the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services4 (CMS) to not reimburse hospitals for higher stage levels for hospital-acquired PUs. In 2011, the Joint Commission5 established a national patient safety goal targeting PU prevention through assessment, re-assessment, and prompt interventions. In short, contemporary stakes are high and expectations the most stringent in the history of American healthcare — PUs and their prevention are a measure of healthcare quality....

Can We Talk?: Do Pressure Ulcer Prevention Protocols Improve Patient Care but Increase Institutional Risk?

  Pressure ulcers are a serious cause of morbidity and cost across all healthcare settings in the United States.1 They are more likely to occur among the elderly, and because the US population age 65 years and older is expected to double within the next 25 years, the number of people with pressure ulcers also is expected to increase.2 Data suggest the incidence of skin breakdown can be reduced with the implementation of protocolized care. Driven in part by legislative initiatives, many institutions have developed pressure ulcer prevention protocols.3 It seems difficult to argue these initiatives can be anything other than good for patients. However, even though pressure ulcer prevention protocols may decrease the incidence of some types of skin breakdown, the frequency of litigation involving pressure ulcers is increasing. Why?...

Can We Talk?: Competitive Bidding for Negative Pressure Wound Therapy: What Will It Mean to You?

  The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) are about to begin Phase 2 of a competitive bidding process that will affect how Medicare will acquire durable medical equipment (DME) for its more than 46 million beneficiaries. DME competitive bidding previously has included crutches, wheel chairs, and powered scooters; now, incongruously, negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) devices are included in Phase 2. Unlike devices intended to support chronic and relatively uncomplicated conditions, NPWT is an active treatment for both acute and complex wounds. The impact on wound care patients and practitioners could be catastrophic....

Can We Talk?: Taking the Lead

     Leadership is the ability to guide, direct, or influence people. A leader can be an individual or a group of people. Leadership can be taking a chance personally or professionally to make a change in your work or practice setting, community, country, or the world. We all have the ability to be leaders.

     Becoming a leader and standing up for core values are not without risk. Because potential or actual leaders often are the targets of criticism and disdain, persons striving to lead may become discouraged and give up. After all, blending in with the cro...